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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get th
much. our next speaker is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california o
] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long t
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
and the last day on tuesday >>> we've seen break throughs in science and john has the top ten science stories at 2010 >> a revolutionary light called litro. >> this will change how we take and experience pictures. >> the camera captures the light field, allowing focus to be changed after it has been taken. no. 9, nasa space craft sent data about an asteroid. it appears vesta went through planet evolution and it's one of a kind. to be one of e only one that's left. >> no. 8, you may have heard the term god pardon cal. the european nuclear center claims to have found it. why is it a ci,]w:qbig deal? think big bang theory. >> in this particle, this set off the explosion that creates the universe. >> after analyzing data generated by an accelerator. >> at 7, a leap of faith. record breaking jump. bub broke the free fall record jumping from 128,000 feet in a space suit. >> i said the whole world is watching and i wish the world could see. cambodiag5a[([ and a package cac 71 was aggressive. he was there when the mystery was solved. >> those organizism and them getting steroids. >> no. 5, space was
>> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
's health and science editor john fowler live now with the beginnings of a levy repair. john? >> reporter: state crews have moved us back from the levy here anticipating that trucks will arrive here momentarily to begin sand bagging. this video now. you can see the creek is much comer than last -- calmer than last might. they worked fast to get this temporary fix underway. >> reporter: not fast enough for residents who lived through repeated flooding here. >> i am worried because it is supposed to rain tomorrow. >> reporter: homeowners cleared mud and debris from the flood. >> like a big lake. lot of trees going down. garbage. >> reporter: the creek topped the levy. 7 homes damaged. several hundred people evacuated. >> having a levy failure here would be catastrophic. >> reporter: as you see that failure began last night. our cameras caught water bubbling through. today officials took an emergency survey. last night's creek flow was the third highest since the levy was built 82 years ago. >> not certified. not in good shape. they will start next year to rebuild the whole system. >> report
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a
for the democrats. and there are folks who with political science looking at this who will say that latinos are really -- that republicans are leaving a lot of latino votes on the table because they're not participating in a comprehensive immigration reform, and i think that that's something that we're going to start to see change. yeah. >> and let me just add to that, too. you touched on it earlier, josh, this whole idea of the divide, the economic divide and the haves and the have-nots, and certainly, latino voters are part of the have-nots in many occasions. the occupy movement, which really got started in 2011, but really exploded in places like oak laerland earlier this year. what impact do you think that had on the national conversation? >> i think it enshrined a place in the national dialogue for issues like income disparity. i mean, the whole fiscal cliff situation is very much, look at the way that's being framed. 98% versus 2%. it's very close to the 99% that was the rallying cry of occupy, and the same thing with the argument over jobs versus austerity. are we going to go the way
health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
with a computer science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelor's in 2009 and my first job was actually at a retail store at the mall. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. so i figured i would go to law school to change to be where i want to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. he is still in college and worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> they settle with retail businesses. even all my friends work at mcdonald's and places like that because of the higher jobs that are hard to get these days. >> reporter: with the low- paying jobs, it will be that much harder. with tuitions rising across the nation, those bills are stacking up. >> one of my friends bar tend and work at the restaurant just to pay off the loan that she got. >> reporter: she has a 4-year- old as she is worried about what kind of a world her daughter will face. >> it is really disstressing. i got out of the school in the early 90s. it's a tough market. >> reporter: with all these colleg
for $49.99. the stuff of science fictio the test. the private space flight company successful . >>> company space eex is testing a rocket. they successfully conducted a test flight of its reusable rocket. this is in texas. the rocket lifted off -- touchdown on the launching pad. they said it's almost ready for its first real lift off. they will save a lot of money. >>> netflix users, i got good news for us. you are in luck. the streaming video service is back online following a christmas eve outage. on its twitter page they blamed amazon's cloud for the problem. wire magazine reports it's the third time this year that an amazon outage has disrupted netflix. they are back online. >>> coming up, santa that prefers a snow board instead. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, need a sleigh to cut a pathn the mountain in steamboat springs, colorado... he bro his snowboard! and even thoh he didn't deliver any prese, he brought lots of smiles te . >>> a man brought his snow board and even though he didn't bring presents's brought a lot of smiles to the skiers who stopped to watch him catch some air. h
science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelors in 2009 and my first job was at a retail store. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. i figured i have to go to law school to get where i wanted to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. bill song is still. >> college and he's worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> all my friends have a hard time. all of my friends with high degrees working at mcdonalds or some places like that, the higher jobs are harder to get nowadays. >> reporter: with a low paying job it's harder for the college grads to pay back student loans. those bills are stacking up. >> one my friends bar tends and works at a restaurant just trying to pay off the lobes she got. >> reporter: maria has a 4-year- old and she's worried about what kind of world her daughter will face. >> it's really distressing. i got out of school in the early 90s. it was a tough market then, but not the way it is now. >> reporter: with all these college graduates in r
for january 15th. reporting live, health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >> ktvu.com has more of the nra's statement today. you can watch the video online. just look under hot topics. >> san francisco giants pitcher made a stop today. talked about the kids. one of his famous strikeout pitches. >> reporter: more than a month may have passed, but sergio romo said as he arrived he's still blown away by it all. including the attention wherever he goes. >> they're here. >> reporter: he's never made a personal appearance at an air force base before. people have been waiting for four hours just to have two minutes with him. some kids got a quick lesson on his slider. he posed with his signature grin for others. for staff sergeant, this was going to make christmas memorable. >> he called me his hero. i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: romo may be the closer forren the giants but he ended up bringing it all home for the servicemen and their families this weekend. >> the latest storm is dumping several feet of snow in the sierra. the snowstorm made driving to the mountains treache
this down to a science now. >> a little girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them. >> by boys and girls, by age, by year. >> three, two, one. >> yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 14 years old. >> last year we had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. >> you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's excited to meet santa claus right now. >> ho, ho, ho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smiles, there you go. >> merry christmas family. >> are you going to ask me what i want for christmas? >> yes, what do you want for christmas. >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably like 500 children. >> start out with five right now. >> my grandma, she's a go getter. she just loves what she does and she's so good at it and you know it's just part of her personality. that's how it's gotten where it's reached where it has. >> good job pedro. >> thank you. >> we came out here the first year to do santa and i don't know it just grew on us and we wanted to come back. >> good
. do a lot of returns. >> reporter: stores throughout the mall displayed sale science, some showing as much as 75%off. >> we want to sell as much, put the spring goods out. we are going to be -- i know we are. >> reporter: november and december count up to 40% of yearly sales, the last two months before christmas were the weakest since 2008. retailers hope to make up by slashing prices, customers had different take its on the deals they saw. >> last year was much better. >> reporter: dispointing? >> little bit. >> 50% off at gap. marked down -- i got tanks, underwear and, yeah. >> reporter: you are happy. >> yeah. >> reporter: and many are expecting to use their gift cards today and they will have plenty of chances to do that. the mall has extended hours today here at valley fair. they will be open until ten tonight. ktvu. >> thank you. for a lot of people the gifts are now unwrapped and sorted. before going to the customer service counter you need to check that exchange poll civil wal-mart has one of the most for giving, taking almost all items for 90 days. the exception is e
? [ applause ] also joining us is the science department chair and the lead author of the report that led to the blue-ribbon designation. so congratulations as well. [ applause ] >> go cardinals. >> do you want to say a few words? >> sure. i would like to thank the board of education, richard and all the outstanding student superintendent and staff and pta and i would like to give a shout out to dakota and jim and allison. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> i wanted to wait for all commendations to take place so that i don't take away from this, but what i would like to do is have some privilege here and maybe make last comments for my last general session after eight years of serving on the school board. i have to say it's been a real privilege to have been here for eight years in this capacity and working with everybody in the school community. i think we have done a lot in eight years. we have accomplished a lot. we have steadily gone uphill in regards to student outcomes. people are beginning to trust us a lot more now in regards to the public in terms of sending their kids to t
do not have the space most middle school have such as a gym, science lab or computer lab. locating an additional 300 middles schoolers on the campus raises concerns for a variety of reasons, most importantly the safety of young children on campus. my daughter has always been weary of the big kids. and i'm sure she is not alone. the idea of having over 300 more big kids on campus that will already have 140 middle schoolers and 13-14 and 168 in 15-16 is frightening for parents and children. if you have been to the campus and i do invite you to visit, you know how compacted the shared space already is. we look forward to the time when the annex is operational and question begin to use the refurbished space. i would like to make a quick [kph-epbgs/] mention of the capacity issue. capacity cannot be viewed only in terms of numbers of students per classroom. the capacity analysis must take into account specialty uses for assembly, library -- one more second please -- library, dance and art and we don't believe there is enough yard space to safely support the population of both schoo
. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes.
a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions they do not cover the holes in the law where san francisco would be liable and 9th circuit has heard by far the majority of the cases 190, cases that is 27.4 percent of all federal cases. >> thanks. >> national population. >> thank you. >> finally. >> could you share with us your 5 and 6 briefly. >
them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. ♪ >> our concern is they are going to be here for a couple of days and everybody is going to have a great time. and we have three days of them and 362 days of everybody else using the park. ♪ ♪ >> this is the fifth year of our partnership with another planet entertainment, where another planet puts on probably the greatest music festival in america for three days here in golden gate park. >> we work with them a lot to prevent and not have any problems. and what we have done with them is have roads built and have pieces under whatever equipment is parked. they do all of that. and then when it gets removed, they have very little damage. >> for me as a gardener and having to stay here and work a
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)

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